Western University Political ScienceFaculty of Social Science

Political Inquiry Colloquium, PIC

The PIC Speaker Series is supported by the Department of Political Science. We gratefully acknowledge their contributions.

2015-2016 Seminars

Speaker: Prof.Radoslav Dimitrov, UWO Political Science
Topic: The Paris Agreement on Climate Change: Behind Closed Doors
Date: Friday, January 22, 2016
Time: 1:00 PM – 2:00 PM
Location: SSC 4255

Abstract: The new Paris Agreement will define the global response to climate change for years to come. What really happened in Paris? This presentation will provide an insider perspective on the negotiations. It will clarify the contentious issues, the positions of major countries including Canada, and the political dynamics behind (very) closed doors. Key elements of the new agreement and its ramifications for climate governance will be discussed. Dr. Dimitrov served on the European Union delegation in Paris, participated actively in secret negotiations that finalized the agreement, and made statements for Bulgaria and the EU.

Poster


Past Seminars

Speaker: Dr. Matthew Hoffmann, University of Toronto
Topic: Catalyzing Political Pathways to Decarbonization
Date: Friday, February 27, 2015
Time: 12:00 - 1:30 PM
Location: SSC 4255

Biography: Dr. Matthew Hoffmann is an Associate Professor of Political Science at the University of Toronto.  He has a number of ongoing research projects in the areas of global governance and environmental politics. In April 2013 he began a new research project on developing pathways to decarbonization, with a number of collaborators from Canada, the US, the UK, and Sweden, funded by the Social Science and Humanities Research Council. His recent book with Oxford University Press examines the emergence and implications of climate governance experiments. He is also engaged in a collaborative study of carbon markets with his colleagues Matthew Paterson (University of Ottawa), Michele Betsill (Colorado State University), and Steven Bernstein (University of Toronto) funded by the Social Science and Humanities Research Council.


Speaker: Dr. Réka Várnagy, Academic Visitor, Corvinus University, Budapest
Topic: Endangered Species? The Fate of Political Parties in Hungary
Date: September 19, 2014
Time: 12:00 - 1:30 PM
Location: SSC 4255

Poster


Speaker: Mark F. N. Franke, Associate Professor and Director, Centre for Global Studies, Huron University College, Western University
Topic: Introducing Politics to the Theories and Practices of IR (a Problem of Global Rights)
Date: October 4, 2013
Time: 12:00 - 1:30 PM
Location: SSC 4255

Biography: Mark F. N. Franke is Associate Professor and Director of the Centre for Global Studies at Huron University College and is a core faculty member of the Centre for the Study of Theory and Criticism at Western University. He received his Ph.D. in Political Science at Johns Hopkins University and has taught previously in Political Science at the University of Victoria and International Studies at the University of Northern British Columbia.  Professor Franke's core areas of research and writing include contemporary political philosophy, human rights, social/political geographies, and theories of space, time, and movement.  He is the author of Global Limits:  Immanuel Kant, International Relations, and Critique of World Politics and journal articles and book chapters on problems regarding international ethics, international human displacement, colonial interests at work in modern theories and politics of rights, and the spatial/temporal politics of human rights discourse and law.

Poster


Speaker: Vuk Radmilovic, Assistant Professor, Department of Political Science, Western University
Topic: A Captured Court? Third Party Interveners at the Supreme Court of Canada
Date: November 8, 2013
Time: 12:00 - 1:30 PM
Location: SSC 4255

Biography: Vuk Radmilovic is a Limited-Term Assistant Professor in Canadian Politics at the University Western of Ontario. He obtained a Ph.D. in the department of Political Science, University of Toronto, in 2011 and worked as a SSHRC post-doctoral research fellow at the Osgoode Hall Law School. His research focuses on Canadian politics, political and legal institutions, judicial politics, and public policy. His research has appeared in the Canadian Journal of Political Science and in the Review of Constitutional Studies.

Poster


Speaker:  Chunhui Fan, Ken Chu Faculty Fellow in Public Administration, Local Government Program, Department of Political Science, Western University
Associate Professor, School of Government, Nanjing University
Topic: Localism and Governance Integration in China
Date: November 29, 2013
Time: 12:00 - 1:30 PM
Location: SSC 4255


Speaker:  Benjamin Muller, Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, King's University College, Western University
Topic: Towards a 'Ferocious Architecture':  Preliminary Reflections on the Sonoran Borderlands
Date: January 31, 2014
Time: 12:00 - 1:30 PM
Location: SSC 4255

Biography: Since obtaining his PhD from Queen’s University Belfast, Northern Ireland, Dr. Muller has published widely in books and academic journals on issues of borders, sovereignty, security and identity, including two monographs: Security, Risk, and the Biometric State: Governing Borders and Bodies (Routledge 2010); and, with Samer Abboud, Rethinking Hizballah: Legitimacy, Authority, Violence (Ashgate 2012). Dr. Muller has provided expert testimony to Canadian Parliamentary committees, contributed to NATO/European Science Foundation reports on ethics and security, and held the first visiting research fellowship at the Border Policy Research Institute at Western Washington University. Dr. Muller has both taught and given guest lectures at more than a dozen Universities and Colleges in Canada and the US, as well as participating in community stakeholder initiatives on borders, security and ethics, in Canada, the US and Northern Ireland. Dr. Muller is currently Associate Professor and teaches Critical Security Studies and International Relations at King’s University College in London, Ontario.

Abstract: Towards a ‘Ferocious Architecture’: Preliminary Reflections on the Sonoran Borderlands To what extent has the amplification of border security surveillance and identification technologies contributed to reconstructed and rearticulated architectures of borders and borderlands? How do these changes reinforce particular performances of nationhood and contribute to symbolic ruptures in borderland communities? This preliminary research examines these issues in the context of the border town of Nogales, which straddles the Arizona-Sonora border.

Poster


Speaker:  Doug Long, Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, University of Western Ontario
Topic: Bentham's Science of Legislation: formative influences
Date: February 14, 2014
Time: 12:00 - 1:30 PM
Location: SSC 4255

Biography: Doug Long is an Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science at what he still regards as the University of Western Ontario. His special interest within the broad area of normative political theory is in the legal and political theory of Jeremy Bentham, the father of English Utilitarianism. He is an Honorary Senior Research Fellow at the Bentham Project, Faculty of Laws, University of London (UK), and has spent an indefensible portion of his life and energy editing early Bentham manuscripts for inclusion in the new and definitive Collected Works of Jeremy Bentham (projected 75 volumes). He is writing a book entitled "Jeremy Bentham: Architect of Jurisprudence", and has published a book and several articles on aspects of Bentham's legal and political theory.

Poster


Speaker:  Veronica Schild, Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, Western University
Topic:  Rethinking Gender and Emancipation Beyond Neoliberal Regulation
Date: February 28, 2014
Time: 12:00 - 1:30 PM
Location: SSC 4255

Biography: Verónica Schild, Ph.D. Born in Chile and educated in the United States and in Canada where she obtained a Ph.D. in Political Science from the University of Toronto, is Associate Professor of Political Science at Western University. She was the Dahlem International Network Professor for Gender Studies at the Freie Universität Berlin (German Winter Semester 2013-2014), and is past Director of Western’s Centre for the Study of Theory and Criticism (2006-2007, 2008-2011).  She is an active member of the Latin American Studies Association, LASA, and was, most recently, Co-Chair of the Gender and Feminist Studies Section of LASA (May 2012-2013). She has also held Visiting Fellowships in Europe and Chile, most recently at the Universidad de Concepción, Chile (Winter 2012) and the Freie Universitat Berlin’s DesiguALdades.net, a research network for the study of entangled inequalities in Latin America (Fall 2012, Summer 2013).
 
She has published extensively on feminism and the women’s movement in Chile, on feminism and neoliberal citizenship, and more recently on feminism and the neoliberalizing state.  Her current research addresses the convergence between dominant (liberal) feminisms and the neoliberalization of the state in Latin America.  Among her recent publications are “Care and Punishment in Latin America: The Gendered Neoliberalization of the Chilean State” in Mark Goodale and Nancy Postero, eds., Neoliberalism, Interrupted (Stanford, 2013); “Feminists and the Neoliberal Revolution in Government:  A Critical Essay on Politics and the State” in Markus Hochmüller et al, eds., Politik in verflochteten Räumen/Los espacios entrelazados de lo politico (Walter Frey, 2013); and “Empowering Consumer Citizens or Governing Poor Female Subjects?  The Institutionalization of “Self-Development” in the Chilean Social Policy Field.”  Journal of Consumer Culture (2007).

Poster


Speaker:  Jason Michelakos
Topic:  Biopolitics and Pro-natalism on the Slave Plantation: Marriage, Financial Reward, and Medical Intervention
Date: March 14, 2014
Time: 12:00 - 1:30 PM
Location: SSC 4255

Biography: Jason Michelakos completed his B.A. Hons. in Philosophy and Political Studies at Trent University in 2004 and was the recipient of the Bagnani Medal. In 2005 he graduated with an M.A. in Political Science from Western University. He is currently a Doctoral candidate in the Social and Political Thought programme at York University, where he is completing a dissertation on Plantation Slavery in Barbados and South Carolina. In 2009 Jason was awarded the Division of Humanities Excellence in Teaching Award at York University. In 2012 the Centre for Research on Latin America and the Caribbean (CERLAC), awarded him the Barbados Canadian Friendship Scholarship. Jason has presented papers for the Canadian Political Science Association, The Canadian Association for Latin American and Caribbean Studies, and the Georgia Political Science Association.

Abstract: A genealogical analysis of the slave plantation complex in Barbados and South Carolina reveals how strategies of racism, bondage, trafficking, surveillance, punishment, labour exploitation, and gendered violence, were shaped by a polyvalent deployment of biopolitical power, which is explicated in Michel Foucault’s philosophical corpus. Disciplinary techniques of regimented labour and strategies of surveillance and punishment were implemented to shape docile slaves, but a governmental incentive apparatus to encourage childbirth not only entrenched procedures of management, but produced opportunity and desires. This paper explores how the plantocracy introduced pro-natalist strategies such as Christian marriage, medical treatment, financial rewards, and intermittent relief from the hardships of field labour to secure a homegrown intergenerational labour force during the late eighteenth and early nineteenth-centuries. The principal sources of information for this paper are taken from the Barbados Department of Archives, the Shilstone Library at the Barbados Museum and Historical Society, and the South Carolina Department of Archives & History. Colonial will documents, government correspondence, and newspaper advertisements are included from these repositories, as well as oral narratives from former slaves compiled by the Federal Writers’ Project of the Works Progress Administration in the 1930s.

Poster


Speaker:  Dr. Manabrata Guha, Prize (Research) Fellow in Security Futures, University of Bath, UK
Topic:  A Cognitive Exploit: The Case of the Force Transformation Project
Date: March 31, 2014
Time: 1:30 - 3:00 PM
Location: SSC 9420

Biography: Manabrata Guha is a Prize (Research) Fellow in Security Futures and author of Reimagining War in the 21st Century : from Clausewitz to Network-Centric Warfare. Abingdon, U. K.: Routledge 2011.  Currently, he is also Hon. Distinguished Fellow at the Center for Joint Warfare Studies (New Delhi, India) and an Adjunct Faculty Member of the National Institute of Advanced Studies (Bangalore, India). He has worked on funded projects with the Defence Research and Development Organization (DRDO), Min. of Defence, Govt. of India.

Abstract: My presentation will suggest that the Force Transformation Project, which has been underway since the late 1990s, is an ambitious attempt to transform not simply how we wage war, but also about how we think about war by binding people, processes, technologies and organizations in a wholly novel and, from a certain perspective, insidious way. To that end, my presentation will offer a brief conceptual genealogy of the most recent Revolution in Military Affairs and will highlight some of the key features of what is popularly known as Network-centric Warfare (NCW). In the process, I will describe, albeit with broad brush-strokes, the nature of the emergent strategic-military battlespace in the 21st Century, how it is being progressively engaged with, and the extent to which these emergent martial constructs depend on the weaponization of information. Using the example of bioinformatics, I will show how the network-centric concept (and the consequent attempt to weaponize information) is being employed in the battlespace; how this is subtly, but unmistakably, transforming the traditional Observation-Orientation-Decision-Action (OODA) Cycle as first theorized by John Boyd; and, how this is contributing to the cognitive transformation that is necessary for the success of the network-centric model of war.

My presentation will conclude by suggesting that this emergent model of warfare is perpetuating an understanding of war and combat in computational/ algorithmic terms and how, as a consequence, it is – perhaps unwittingly – becoming its own prisoner.

Poster


Speakers: Round Table Discussion with Anna Dolidze, Visiting Professor, Centre for Transitional Justice and Post-Conflict Resolution, Western University; Marta Dyczok, Associate Professor, Department of Political Science, Western University; Alexander Larichev, Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Political Science, Western University (2012-2013); Assistant Professor, Faculty of Law and Public Governance, Petrozavodsk State University, Russia
Topic: Post-Soviet Transformation in Russia, Ukraine and Georgia: Media Law and Government
Date: April 5, 2013
Time: 12:30 - 1:30 PM


Speaker: Doug Long, Western University
Topic: Bentham: From Jurisprudence to Political Science
Date: March 22, 2013
Time: 12:30 - 1:30 PM


Speaker: Guodong "Ted" Zheng, Chu Faculty Fellow, Western University (2012-2013); Lecturer, Shandong University
Topic: Characteristics of the Public Servant Systems in China
Date: January 25, 2013
Time: 12:30 - 1:30 PM


Speaker: Anna Dolidze, Visiting Scholar, Centre for Transitional Justice and Post-Conflict Resolution, Western University
Topic: The Future of NGO Participation in the International Legal Process
Date: November 30, 2012
Time: 12:30 - 1:30 PM


Speaker: Alexander Larichev, Postdoctoral Fellow, Department of Political Science, Western University (2012-2013); Assistant Professor, Faculty of Law and Public Governance, Petrozavodsk State University, Russia
Topic: The Phantom Menace: Rise of the New State Ideology in Russia
Date: October 26, 2012
Time: 12:30 - 1:30 PM


Speaker: Keith Darden, Associate Professor of Social Science, (Political Science), Yale-NUS College
Topic: Schooling, Nationalism and Armed Resistance to Occupation
Date: September 28, 2012
Time: 12:00 - 1:00 PM